Screencap from Myths & Monsters, Netflix

“The tales have been told since man first gathered around the fires of prehistory.”

It was cold as shit outside as the US was going through a second ice-age. I shook my boots, brushed my coat and hair in a futile attempt to rid it from all the ice crystals, before they turned me into a cold, damp mess. As I put my gloves, hat, scarf and everything else on the radiator, I decided it was the perfect day to watch Netflix.
Myths & Monsters was the first item on my list of recommendations. Having to battle the elements outside made me adventurous and I decided to give it a try. After watching the first five seconds I already knew I was going to love this show. That is extremely rare, but what can I say? It really hit home.

The show

Myths & Monsters is a documentary series that explores the history of legends, what they were influenced by and how they turned out the way we know them today. The main subject is European mythology with a focus on Greek and Roman cultures. Each episode starts with a story, presented by the narrator and brought to life by talented artists who made wonderful paintings and animations for it. The music elevates the fantasy to a whole new dimension, wrapping it together with a nice little bow. Each story is unique in its purpose; not all of them are cautionary tales. They teach us about certain ideas, values, the structures of society and the restoration of social order. They challenge the listener with very serious social and ethical problems that allow us to peer into the minds of people that lived thousands of years ago.

What else?

In my humble opinion, it’s worth watching even if all you do is listen to the music and look at the artwork. The entire series is like a Pandora Journey video, but with an actual story being told.

The Power of Epic Music – Full Mix Vol. 3, Pandora Journey

It’s worth a watch even if all you do is look at the artwork and listen to the music. It’s informative and you can definitely learn something from it, although your experience may vary based on where you grew up. If you are from Europe or you are more versed in European mythology, you might find it frustrating that after a while they focus too much on Greek and Roman mythology. Having learned about some of these myths when I was younger, I found that they weren’t that interesting to me, because I already knew what was going to happen in them. For me, this marked the weakest point in the series. I would have loved to see a wider selection of cultures. On the other hand, I understand that most of the legends were necessary examples because of their importance regarding the history of story telling, especially if shown to people who might have zero exposure to any of these cultures.

Personal favorites?

I really liked the first two episodes, especially the second one, The Wild Unknown. It focused on the conflict between nature and men and it really gave me a sense of understanding about how terrifying, raw, untamed nature appeared to our ancestors. My least favorite episode is the last one, because I felt that it was lacking in some way. It wasn’t bad by any means but it was a bit anticlimactic. The main story that was read by the narrator wasn’t strong enough to carry the entire episode. It was kind of boring, even though there was plenty of action in there. I think there was just so much material regarding the subject that they couldn’t focus on it properly. Either that, or I was just really tired.

[…] every corner of the Earth has its legends to tell.

I hope you give it a watch and let me know what you think! I really hope there will be a second season; I can’t wait to watch it!

love, Alice

Special thanks for Miandelam for her continued support and sense of humor.